IRA Withdrawal Rules – When Can You Withdraw Your IRA?

by Jason on April 5, 2010

For some reason I get this question a lot, so I thought I’d provide a little clarification on IRA withdrawal rules.

Individual Retirement Arrangements or IRAs were designed to provide an opportunity for folks to save for retirement on a pre-tax, tax-deferred basis.  In other words, the money grows without having to pay any taxes on the gains.

Of course, with an IRA you have to pay the Piper at some point in time.  That means when you get into retirement and start your IRA withdrawals, you’ll have to pay taxes.  This can create a “tax-time bomb” in retirement, but I won’t get into that here. Speaking of tax time, if you’re going to file your taxes with TurboTax, make sure you look up some TurboTax discount codes before you file.

The short answer to when you can take your IRA withdrawals is – any time

People are often shocked by that answer, but it’s true.

You can access your money through an IRA withdrawal any time you’d like, but you just better be aware of the tax and penalty ramifications.

If you take your IRA withdrawal after age 59 1/2 you won’t have to worry about any penalties, just the taxes.

There are some exceptions to taking money out before age 59 1/2, so let’s take a look at an early IRA withdrawal:

Your IRA Withdrawal Prior to Age 59 1/2

The general rule is that if you take an IRA withdrawal before 59 1/2 the IRS whacks you with a 10% penalty.  So, ideally you need to wait on your IRA withdrawal until you reach that age.

As with most IRS rules, there are some exceptions:

IRS publication 590 lists these exceptions to the 10% penalty for early IRA withdrawals:

  • You have unreimbursed medical expenses that are more than 7.5% of your adjusted gross income.
  • The distributions are not more than the cost of your medical insurance
  • You are disabled.
  • You are the beneficiary of a deceased IRA owner.
  • You are receiving distributions in the form of an annuity.
  • The distributions are not more than your qualified higher education expenses.
  • You use the distributions to buy, build, or rebuild a frist home.
  • The distribution is due to an IRS levy of the qualified plan.
  • The distribution is a qualified reservist distribution

These exceptions to the early IRA withdrawal rules have some qualifiers on them so it’s important to look at the IRS publication to make sure you fit into one of these categories before you take the money out.

For example, the exception that says you can take the money in the form of annuity – basically what the IRS means here is that you must take “substantially equal period payments”  – in other words a set amount per year for either a) five years or b) til 59 1/2, whichever is longer.

Also, be aware that these exceptions are for the 10% premature distribution penalty NOT taxes!  You still have to pay taxes on any IRA withdrawal.

Your IRA Withdrawal After Age 59 1/2

Reaching the magic age of 59 1/2 is one retirement milestone you should look forward to.

Once you reach this age, you can begin to take your IRA withdrawal penalty free!  At this point you can take out as much as you want, whenever you want.

Again, there is no escaping the taxes (unless of course you open a Roth IRA and make sure you’re aware of the 2013 Roth IRA contribution limits) so just be aware that every dollar you pull out will be as if you earned that money for the year – it counts as ordinary income.

By the way, you literally must reach age 59 1/2 – not 59, 5 months and 15 days. You can take the money any time on the day you turn 59 1/2 or after.

Just because you turned 59 1/2 doesn’t mean you have to take the money out though.  You may not want to.  If you’ve done a good job establishing other sources of income, you may decide to wait.

Remember that the 2013 IRA contribution limit is $5,500, up $500 from 2012!

Your IRA Withdrawal at Age 70 1/2

If you do decide to wait however, you won’t be able to leave that money in your IRA forever.

At age 70 1/2 you will be required to take a minimum distribution ( also known as RMD, which uses a formula set up by the IRS to determine the amount) and pay taxes on those withdrawals.

But, what if you don’t need the money and you’d rather wait?  That’s fine, but just know that good ol’ Uncle Sam will uppercut you with a 50% penalty on the amount that should’ve been distributed along with the normal taxes due.

They want to make sure they get their tax revenue some how. So be aware that sooner or later you HAVE to take money out of your IRA.

So remember, you can always take an IRA withdrawal, but you need to know the right rules and regulations to determine when a distribution will be right for you.

This was a post I originally did for ChristianPF.com and thought I’d share it here as well.

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{ 57 comments… read them below or add one }

Phil January 14, 2013 at 10:24 am

If you repay the money withdrawn from an IRA within 60 days there are no tax consequences, correct? For example, if I withdraw $25,000 and then repay it within 60 days no problem. If i withdraw $10,000 and then $15,000, and I attempt to repay with $25,000, it won’t be the same as I will pay taxes on the $10,000 but not the $15,000. You can only repay a withdrawal once every 365 days, correct?

JB February 19, 2013 at 2:43 pm

If I am leaving the country and withdrawal the money while living outside the US territory… What kind of penalty would I pay? Since I am not in a state, will I get state tax? I am 31

Thanks

Roth Ira Roll Over May 13, 2013 at 2:48 pm

Thanks in support of sharing such a nice thinking,
piece of writing is nice, thats why i have read it fully

Sinh Nguyen June 13, 2013 at 11:22 am

What’s # to call IRA please ?

Redeeming Riches July 22, 2013 at 3:32 pm

Depends on what department you want. You can find them here http://www.irs.gov/uac/Telephone-Assistance

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Kelly Nosko February 12, 2014 at 6:51 pm

Is there an age at which you should close out your IRA account?

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